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Your questions -
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Frequently asked questions - and answers.

For doctors

No, MAGNEZIX® implants with the same dimensions have similar compression and tear-out forces as titanium implants. However, they are far superior in terms of stability and handling to PLA/PGA implants. 
MAGNEZIX® implants degrade over a period of 12 to 24 months via an apatite phase to transform into endogenous tissue. The degradation speed of the implant varies between individuals, and is influenced by many factors, such as the site of the implantation, the local metabolism, the age of the patient, etc.  
No, because the screws contain more than 90 % magnesium, corresponding to around 150 mg in a MAGNEZIX® CS 3.2 (20 mm length). This amount is roughly comparable to the amount of magnesium contained in three large bottles of mineral water, and can be ignored when compared to the total amount of magnesium in the human body, especially because the screws degrade over a longer period of time.
Yes, because for young patients in particular, removing an implant is usually important to enable unimpeded further growth. This is why this patient group in particular benefits especially from the bioresorbable MAGNEZIX®  implants. Nevertheless, the implants should not be implanted in epiphyses.
There are no scientifically-based findings on this aspect at the moment. We can therefore not currently recommend their use, particularly because of the osteoconductive properties of MAGNEZIX®.
MAGNEZIX® implants degrade into endogenous tissue via several different interim stages. The degradation products of the MAGNEZIX®-alloy are either metabolised in the body and/or excreted via the kidneys. The interim product apatite is converted into bone via the continuous remodelling process. 
MAGNEZIX® implants do not usually have to be removed. Nevertheless, if in rare cases one is faced with the indication for a revision, the screw implants can be removed using a screw driver in the first weeks after implantation. If removal at a later stage is necessary, the screw - just like the other implants - can be overdrilled and if necessary replaced by a new implant. It is also possible here to cut it with an oscillating saw (an advantage compared to conventional metal implants)
Yes, the operational techniques, instrumentation and handling are comparable. MAGNEZIX® implants are also self-cutting, but not self-drilling. Special care must therefore be taken when pre-drilling the hole during the operation to avoid weakening the implant. Metallic implants which are not made of MAGNEZIX® should not be in permanent direct contact with a MAGNEZIX® implant, but only temporarily during the period of the operation.
Yes, MAGNEZIX® implants are highly visible in all radiological images. However, because MAGNEZIX® has a similar X-ray density to cortical bone, it does not generate artefacts in X-rays, CT or MRT (during the intra-operative use of an image converter in particular, any guide wires, reposition wires, instruments etc. which may be in the vicinity should be removed because foreign materials in the irradiated zone can increase the radiation dose, and prevent MAGNEZIX® implants from being adequately imaged - effect of "excess radiation").
The osteoconductive behaviour of magnesium alloys has been verified by investigations carried out by a large number of research groups, and has also been shown by MAGNEZIX® CS in clinical applications.

For patients

MAGNEZIX® is a material consisting of various elements, of which magnesium accounts for more than 90 %. MAGNEZIX® implants have almost all the advantages of metal screws (stability), but are completely transformed in the body and replaced by endogenous bone tissue.
Various operations which require an implant for temporary stabilisation. The MAGNEZIX® CS (fracture compression screw) for instance can be used for the fixation of small bones or bone pieces. The most frequent operation carried out so far is correcting (often very painful) bunions (Hallux valgus) and/or the scaphoid bone in the hand. The screws have also been successfully used in other areas such as in the radius bone, the hips and in the ankle. Your orthopaedic/trauma surgeon can tell you if a MAGNEZIX® implant is the right choice for you.
Yes, because it not only resorbs very slowly step-by-step, but also because the material MAGNEZIX® has properties which promote the growth of bone. As time passes and the screw gradually resorbs, the newly formed bone successively bears the increasing load.
MAGNEZIX® implants resorb via various interim stages into the body's own tissue. The degradation products of the MAGNEZIX® screws are broken down in the body and/or excreted via the kidneys. 
No, because the screws contain more than 90 % magnesium, corresponding to around 150 mg in a MAGNEZIX® CS 3.2 (20 mm length). This amount is roughly comparable to the amount of magnesium contained in three large bottles of mineral water, and can be ignored when compared to the total amount of magnesium in the human body, especially because the screws degrade over a longer period of time.
Yes, because for young patients in particular, removing an implant is usually important to enable unimpeded further growth. This is why this patient group in particular benefits especially from the biotransformable MAGNEZIX® implants.
Other implants made of the MAGNEZIX® material are currently in the development phase. As soon as these are available in the hospitals, we will inform you here.